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View life from Outside of your Cave

The Seven stages of the Dialogue and critical thinking for a total group transformation

The practice of skilfully facilitated conversation and deep Dialogue in any group offers the opportunity to increase our awareness of our own assumptions and perspectives and participate more consciously and carefully in the way we interact with the world. We are no longer help captive by one “privileged” worldview.  Our practice of Dialogue disrupts our worldviews and aids our ability to hold multiple perspectives at once; this true is wisdom.  Peter Senge coined the term creative tension to indicate how a group feels when it experiences the gap between where it is and where it wants to go.  When in deep Dialogue, we are constantly experiencing this creative tension which underpins all change work. Without the gap “there would be no need for any action to move toward a vision. Indeed, the gap is the source of creative energy.

The Art of Dialogue program teaches and supports groups to move through seven distinct stages of transformation that are universally experienced when engaged in the deep Dialogic processes.  These are not a random back and forth, but there is actually an awakening that occurs through a specific and disciplined process. The participatory leadership skills of hosting conversation and dialogue is the combination of art and science. The Art of Dialogue workshops teach leaders the disciplines and ground rules but it is the practice of hosting conversation that ultimately supports the artistic element of great participatory leadership.

Stage one- A radical encountering of difference in world-views

 This first encounter comes with a certain shock, with a realization of an Other, a different way of life, a different worldview, an alien Other that resists, interrupts, disrupts my settled patterns of interpreta­tion. With this encounter, there is a new realization that my habits of mind cannot make sense of this Other.

 Stage two- crossing over, letting go and entering the world of the other

 I face a person who has a worldview alien from mine.” We are now encountering a subject who has a view of us, which we hadn’t really thought of before. We always thought we had a view of every-thing else and we incorporated everything else into our worldview.

After the initial shock and realization that I now face alien worldviews very different from my own, I feel challenged to inquire, investigate, engage and enter this new world, to engage in critical-thinking. As I open my Self to this Other I realize that I must learn new habits and ways of interpretation to make sense of this different world.

Stage three-  Inhabiting and experiencing the world of the Other

 I begin to feel a new and deep empathy for my new habitat; I want to let myself go, experiment, learn and grow in this new way of being, to embrace critical-thinking. I hold on to my prior views as much as I can, but also experience the worldview of the Other. I have a new profound realization of an alternative reality. But in the end, I realize this is not my home.  I experience a deep shift in perspective and feel the start of a transformation.  We feel our thinking has been expanded and enriched by taking aboard other worldview. Something profound starts to happen.

Stage four –  Crossing back with expanded vision and knowledge

I cross back, return to my own world with expanded knowledge of how to think and act critically and may adopt the new worldviews into my own world as a result of this encounter. I now realize that there are other ways of understanding reality. I am therefore open to rethinking how I see myself, others and the world. There is no return to my former self of seeing the world from the confines of my own small worldview

 Stage five – the dialogic/ critical awakening: a radical mind-shift

self inwardly transformed

 As a result of this new encounter with other worldviews, I cross back and begin to experience a profound shift in all aspects of my world; in my inner experience, in my encounter with others, in my relating to the world. I begin to realize that my encounter with the Other has shaken the foundation of my former worldview, my former identity. I can no longer return to my former and now begin to realize that there are many other worlds, other forms of life, other perspectives that surround me.  This stage is almost like a spiritual awakening or a classic transformation and the blossoming of wisdom.

 Stage six- the group awakening- the paradigm shift matures

In my transformed Dialogical/Critical Awakening I discover a deeper common ground between the multiple worldviews and perspectives that surround me. I have a new sense that myself and others are inseparably connected in an inter-relational web. I realize that multiplicity and diversity enriches my Self and my World.

As my new inner dialogue and critical-thinking evolves I find myself in a new and transformed relation with others. This new phase of relations with my peers can be disorienting and disconcerting, for as I now dramatically grow in my new identity I find myself in an estranged distance from many of my old relationship. I am learning how to live from a new world view which requires a new language.  As in all transformations this period can often be challenging and confronting.

Stage seven – personal transformation maturing

As this paradigm-shift in my life matures I realize that there is a deep change in all aspects of my life, a new moral consciousness and a new practice. As my new dialogical/critical consciousness becomes a habit of life I find that my behaviour and my disposition to others has blossomed. I feel a new sense of communion. I have a deeper sense of belonging to my world, to my community, and with this a boundless sense of responsibility in all of my conduct. I now realize that I am transformed in the deepest habits of mind and behaviour. I find a deeper sense of Self-realization and fulfilment and meaning in my life and my relations with others and the world around me.

 

 

How to expand your views by changing how you converse

How to expand your views by changing how you converse

Earth Water Air Fire
Informational Discussion Conversation Dialogue

One of the most evocative ways to be truly mindful of the different ways of conversing and communicating is by using the archetypes of the four elements (Earth, Water Air and Fire).  The attributes of each elements strongly resonate with the four forms (Informational, Discussion, Conversation and Dialogue) of communicating and help us to visualise the limitations and appropriateness of each mode. When we are conscious and aware of the conversation we are holding in relation to the elements there can be necessary preparation that enables groups to maximise the benefits of each type of communication and have the skills to transition between these. This is mindfulness in action.

This elemental framework can be used as a diagnostic tool, helping to identify entrenched communication patterns, while providing a practical set of exercises and principles upon which these patterns can be shifted towards a style of communicating that is more appropriate to the goal of the particular situation.  When the elemental framework is used consciously by a group, it can provide a powerful tool for regulating dialogue when situations arise in which communication might normally get stuck, move too fast, or leave participants feeling disempowered or frustrated.

 

The Elements of communication

Earth communication corresponds to a completely objective consciousness, where any received content simply becomes a ‘that’, a fact, to be manipulated, dodged, ignored, and so forth. It does not take the other party into account at all, except as another fact to be assimilated. Water communication corresponds to an Imaginative consciousness, in which we form inner pictures of the movements of the other’s speech, but these pictures are still heavily tinged with our own personal associations and assumptions. Air communication corresponds to Inspirative consciousness, in which, through silencing our own expressive tendencies, we create an inner space in which the gesture of the other can speak, in a spiritual sense by breathing into our own soul something of itself. In Fire communication, this process takes on the form of the even more unitive process of Intuition, where it is possible to have the experience that the normal duality separating ‘me’ from ‘you’ is burned away, so that I feel as if something essential of you is living inside.

Earth communication (Informational)

When we think of the element earth we can imagine definite boundaries to the substances; the mountain top is precisely here, the rock occupies just this specific space. We could therefore describe earth elements as definite, shaped, and located. Earth elements also have the tendency to be rigid and resistant to change – that is, to maintain their shape and position.

The Earth mode of communication is dominantly content‐based, comprised of statements of fact which strongly indicate ‘how things are’. The primary goal of Earth communication is to clarify the facts of a situation, to provide information, and to create a shared foundation upon which the further stages of communication develop. As there is little need for any kind of actual back-and-forth when communicating there is a lack of flow.  It may in fact feel like no interaction is occurring at all, or that you have no recourse or ability to respond as information seems to move in one way only.  The language of Earth communications can often take an impersonal form even when everyone knows it is coming from a real person, for example, “A decision has been reached” rather than “We have all come to a decision”, or “Company policy states…” instead of “I would love to help you but I have to adhere to company policy” and so forth.

Earth communication can be extremely efficient, direct, and clear, as well as the least emotionally charged way of communicating. In order to have healthy Earth communication, the task of the speaker is to be straightforward, impartial, complete, and precise. The task of the hearer in Earth communication is to simply recognize the presented facts without reaction or judgment, but with distinction, and to request clarifying information if needed.

Earth communication works best when it follows established channels and when the participants – specifically the receivers – are properly prepared and conscious of the purpose and appropriateness of this mode of communication.

 

Water Communication (Discussion)

Water has no intrinsic form – its form is given entirely by its context. And still being greatly under the influence of gravity, will seek the lowest local position, where it will gather and form itself into an exact complementary shape to its surroundings; it is conforming (it forms‐together). Water also penetrates its surroundings, moving into objects as much as possible (permeation).

Water communication is a back and forth type discussion that takes the form of a debate. It is the way in which the facts work together to create a stream of meaning that forms the basis of Water communication. It is a higher level of communicating than can occur in a purely Earth situation, but as such it creates both new problems and opportunities.

When we are in a Water mode of communication we constantly relate what is said based on our own personal worldviews or meanings. Thus, if not conducted with awareness we risk creating heated discussions. Most conflict that occurs evolves out of the unhealthy Water mode of communicating.  There is no attempt to see things from the other perspective but to convince the other of being right. When a speaker is unaware of such personal aspects creeping into their communication, they risk alienating, offending, or simply losing their audience. If a speaker is conscious of these aspects when communicating, then it becomes much easier to avoid the potential pitfalls, both because the assumptions can be made public to begin with, and because any unwanted ripples can be addressed directly and without the feeling for needing a defence on the part of the speaker. Needless to say, this task is quite a difficult one to accomplish, but can become something with practice.

For healthy Water communication, the task of the speaker is to mindfully bring to the surface any assumptions, implicit associations, and logical gaps present in their own speech, making sure that each fact is properly connected to the previous and the next. The task of the hearer in Water communication is to become sensitised to the way meaning flows through the speaker’s speech while ‘testing’ that flow against the hearer’s own flow of meaning, so as to gain better insight into the hidden elements of both the speaker’s and hearer’s perspective.

 

Air Communication (Conversation)

Communication at the Air level takes the form of making verses together: conversation.32 What was primarily lacking in Water – the ability to get beyond one’s own personal set of associations, train of thought, assumed meanings, and unquestioned assumptions – becomes a central feature in Air, where it is precisely these aspects which are consciously put ‘on hold’. The hallmark of Air communication is the ability for participants to not simply hear the words spoken by the other for purposes of discussion, but to really listen to them. This means that a listener creates an expanded, empty space within, which is kept free from the Water tendency to relate everything to “me”.

By drying out the rhythmic impulse to associate everything that we hear to our own default assumptions and experiences, we open up the possibility that a completely new set of experiences be made available to us, as if blown on the wind of the other’s words. If the exchange seems to wander and diverge from any specific aim, or lots of tangents are taken that are not then connected back to an original thread, you are probably in an Air conversation.

 

Air questions give themselves up to the possibility of any outcome. When you end a conversation, and feel like you have really connected with someone, expressed yourself, or felt like you saw a new side of thing, but nothing specific was accomplished and no decisions or new steps were taken, then you probably had an Air conversation.

 

Fire (Dialogue)

The highest form of communication can be called dialogue. A skilfully hosted group Dialogue can achieve this sense of oneness and knowing that is beyond the individual.

In Fire dialogue, we can have the feeling that, in truth, we are all connected, and that a higher principle has, as it were, come down to take part in the exchange, filling it with something completely beyond what any individual is capable of bringing, but only because of the work done by the participants.

In this sense, a true dialogue transcends every individual while bringing each individual along a transformative ride. Indeed, having the experience of dialogue is almost always transformative, providing a foundation for an understanding that leads directly to action.

In dialogue, there is as often as much silence as speaking because the meaning of an exchange is no longer bound to the actual words. In Earth, meaning is absolute, independent of the speaker. In Water, meaning arises from the personal trail of connections and associations of the individual, who defends, justifies, and pushes for its acceptance with great attachment. In Air, each individual’s meaning is allowed to live together with all the other’s meanings simultaneously, but is still experienced personally through oscillation between active and passive roles. In Fire, meaning cannot be attributed to any individual, but seems to be spontaneously generated out of the combined will of the group (or pair) as a whole.

The Art of Dialogue – Awakening Awareness

Over the next few blogs I will be discussing skills and practices one needs to develop as an effective Dialogue facilitator or host. Hosting dialogue is an art form and not a method that can simply be learnt and followed. It takes a well-developed evolved leader to skilfully host great Dialogues. And as with any art forms one requires a solid framework of skills to work with but most importantly, requires practice and well-honed self-awareness skills to manage and skilfully harvest the subtleties and energies that emerge from good group Dialogue. These skills are the foundations for any extraordinary transformative leader who want to get the very best out of people and generate a creative harmonious, innovative learning culture.

To be an extraordinary leader in the world of constant change requires an understanding that your community or organisation and knowledge, are living things that constantly shifts moment by moment in line with the ever constant unfolding of the Universe. This unfolding and our ever shifting ways of knowing takes place through the coming together of (different) things in a communion that does not deny the voice or inner character of any individual. This is how life in all its forms is born.

It takes great courage and awareness for any individual leader to comprehend that we are part of something greater. Skilfully hosted Dialogue encourages groups and individuals to effectively participate in the unfolding of meaning – a creative interaction that allows new insights and unexpected ideas to emerge from the encounter. When we put our own ego aside we are more likely to experience the world in a state of flow and ride the magic of synchronicity that emerges with this state.

Dialogue can be described as a practice that awakens the desire for, and provides the means to, expand consciousness of each other and access untapped wisdom beyond our own worldview or paradigms. The mere presence of the other in Dialogue helps us to break up our own bias and narrowness and offers deep self-understanding.

Mindfulness in action

To support your skills in hosting dialogues there is a very simple but incredibly powerful exercise I recommend that helps develop your awareness skills; essential for any extraordinary leader and Dialogue host. I find this practice rewilds and reawakens my awareness to the world as  living and constantly changing, enabling me see things as they are, not limited by my conditioned lens of perspectives.

Our natural state is to move into a mechanistic deadened patterned way of thinking when walking in the same areas more that a few times. We almost walk with all our senses closed down assuming that things remain the same. To shifting our patterned perspective and participate in the living world around us take yourself out for a walk at lunch. in town, or in park or around your neighbourhood and just be aware of all the things that happen moment by moment that you never planned for.

This practice asks you to become aware of everything that happens that you did not expect or intend. As you become more experienced you will start noticing the minute experience such as a line of ants crossing your path that you would not have noticed before. Just be aware of them. Notice a bird flying across your path or hear the sound of a bird that you could not have planned for. Be aware of each noise or person bumping past you. A siren screeching by, a gust of wind, a person chatting, or anything at all that crosses your path that you could never have planned or expected to see or smell or feel. Your world starts to come truly alive and awakened again as you begin to experience things from a very different perspective. Your ego takes a back seat as you are practicing being in the world without trying to dictate or predict future events.

When you become a little more experienced with this practice you can then play with it throughout the whole day. This is mindfulness in action. Start asking yourself “What did I just experience that I wasn’t expecting?” When I bring awareness to this we realize how much of what we experienced was actually not expected. To really appreciate those few moments when something new and unexpected appears, and then to vividly re-picture those experiences helps cultivate sensitivity to the unexpected. This in turn helps develop the sensitivities to be a good host of conversations and group Dialogues. When I practice creating this field of openness. I can begin to experience another person, a landscape, or a social problem as a living thing with openness and fresh eyes.

 

 

 

Cultivating new ways of being

Cultivating new ways of being through “living thinking”.

New Renowned Indian philosopher and educator Krishnamurti argued that our ways of thinking and learning currently places barriers between ourselves and the object we are dealing with. He wrote that “by being aware, one discovers how one is conditioned- “don’t sit on the bank and speculate about the river; jump in and follow the current of this awareness, and you will find out for yourself how extraordinarily limited our thoughts, our feelings, and our ideas are. Accordingly, he argued that for ‘true transformation’,

“There must be a constant awareness…an awareness in which there is no choice, no condemnation or comparison, that is, there must be the capacity to see things as they are without distorting or translating them. The moment we judge or translate what is seen, we distort it according to our background. It is this very discovery of ourselves as we are, without any sense of condemnation or justification, that brings about a fundamental transformation in what we are -and that is the beginning of wisdom”.

When we become increasingly aware of our own assumptions and perspectives, we notice that they only illuminate certain aspects of other phenomena in the world around us. Scientist, researcher and author Craig Holdrege of the Nature Institute believes that by increasing our awareness of our own assumptions and perspectives we participate more consciously and carefully in the way we interact with the world. Importantly Holdrege states that the physical world of our lived experience informs our knowing more and more as we transform ourselves.

Author, poet and philosopher Henry David Thoreau believed that we need to learn with new eyes and ground our knowledge in the world of the lived experience of things rather than in ideas, concepts and theories (abstract thinking). Thoreau wrote, “it is only when we forget all our learning that we begin to know…If you would make acquaintance with the ferns you must forget your botany…. Your greatest success will be simply to perceive things as they are… I must walk more with free senses – I must let my senses wander as my thoughts – my eyes see without looking…. Be not preoccupied with looking. Go not to the object let it come to you…. What I need is not to look at all – but a true sauntering of the eye.”

In order to experience the flow of life and its specific qualities in all living and non-living things, we need fluid dynamic (process orientated) thinking. I have come to realize how nature can teach us about a living, dynamic way of thinking. If I am willing to pay attention I can learn from nature how to think in a living way without casting my own filters onto the world. My trips into the wild offer a chance to practice deep observation using the growth and development of plants as an especially vivid and rich model to learn the idea of living thinking.

Holdrege reminds us that a growing plant sends roots spreading intimately through the soil, taking in and exchanging with the earth. These are qualities we, too, possess when, as sensory beings, we explore and meet the world with fresh eyes. Always growing, always probing, meeting things anew, we become rooted in the experiential world.

As a flowering plant grows, it unfolds leaf after leaf. When the plant grows up toward flowering, the lower leaves die away. So a plant lives by unfolding something very important at that moment, then moves on to make new structures while past forms fall away. This is a great metaphor on how we can work with our own concepts: instead of falling in love with a particular idea and holding on to it at all costs (object-thinking) – we could learn to form a concept, use it, and then let it die away as our experience evolves. Our deeply felt sense of our own boundaries and ignorance allows us to keep knowledge alive, open, and growing. The wilderness provides great lessons in what it means to be undogmatic, dynamic and adaptable.

If we were to think plantlike, our concepts would stay closely connected to the context they arose from, and if that context changed, we would metamorphose our ideas to stay within the fast flowing river of life. By practicing this we can experience ourselves as active receptive participants in an ongoing, evolving conversation with everything around us. We are no longer distant onlookers gazing coolly at a world of objectified things. While gaining this re-connection and rootedness in the world is exhilarating but not always going to be easy.

The moment we become aware of the participatory, interactive nature of knowing, everything changes. We become directly aware of the implications on all our actions and thoughts. A living thinking is a thinking that knows itself as firmly embedded in the world. It is also a thinking that knows it does not have all the answers,

Holdrege writes that the seeds of this transformation are created every time we catch ourselves considering a problem in our lives through some pre-formed conceptual lens and then drop that lens and turn back, in openness, to the things themselves. With heightened awareness we can begin forming concepts out of interaction with the world rather than imposing them upon the world. This is living thinking.

Often I find myself at the beginning of a multi day walk, full of purpose and high expectation. It’s hard to escape the craving for results from everything we do. It usually takes two full days of wilderness immersion before I drop my expectations and fall into nature’s rhythms. This strong sense of purpose can prevent us from seeing the unexpected. So, by going out purposefully with a broad focus of open expectation, I can overcome limitations and invite the world in.

An exercise to practice openness in our daily living is to pause during the evening and think back over the day. “What did I experience today that I wasn’t expecting?” When I bring awareness to this we realize how much of what I experienced was actually expected. To really appreciate those few moments when something new and unexpected appears, and then to vividly re-picture those experiences to myself can help cultivate sensitivity to the unexpected. When I practice creating this field of openness. I can begin to experience another person, a landscape, or a social problem as a living thing with openness and fresh eyes.

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