Participatory Leadership is simply Quantum Science in action

The science of Quantum physics proved what our indigenous ancestors have known for ever that we are part of a world of relationships. At the heart of the Quantum is the capacity to relate which is at the foundation of all forms of life.  The universe unfolds through relationships–multiple, messy relationships–that bring together all things in creative symbiosis. Life is less the survival of the fittest than the flourishing of those that fit together.  Simply put, life is Dialogic. We need to practice skilful dialogue to build these sustainable relationships for resilience, creativity and innovation. This understanding of the world is at odds with current worldview of competition and the importance of the Self.

The capacity to relate constitutes all things. The implications for this understanding in the world of business dictates how we can manage resilient productive workplaces.  Life emerges, the scientists tell us, as a chord that explodes out of separate notes held together into something that had no reality before the relationship, and has no reality when the relationship ceases. All things are energized by the creative force of the universe and shaped by relationships.

The ability for most CEO’S and political leaders to understand that we exist in a web of balanced relationships rather than the competitive monocentric worldview is however understandable.  In the business world, many business leaders have reached that position of power because they have been competitive in a deep driven way at each stage of their careers. However, they potentially become victims of the competitive behaviour when they reach the top, precisely at the point where they need to think relationally and dialogically most of all.

The same is true in politics where we see good campaigners who get elected but extremely poor leaders. They may get elected because they represent an ideology, but to be an effective legislator you have to be able to dialogue and relate across ideological boundaries. Not all of those people that are in those positions have been able to do this. The skills that get people power are not the skills that make them effective when they have it.

The three levels of reality

The universe is basically comprised of three levels of reality: The Virtual, the Quantum, and the Material. The Virtual can be described as the unknown or the not-yet. It is the source of life where all potential lies and all possibility exists. Everything exists here as unmanifested potential. It might be defined as a reservoir of energy that feeds all things, the ground of being itself, the life force that drives the universe.

The Quantum level of reality is the world of relationships: patterns of interaction beneath the surface of things that suggest probability, which is how physicists would define objects–“patterns of probability.” One example of these patterns of probability is the relationship of electrons that circle a nucleus and which constitute–are the foundation for–an atom. Atoms, which we tend to think of as the building blocks of things, are, in fact, mostly space (possibility) where particles relate in patterns (probability) that allow the atoms to exist.

We all exist in this world of potential that is manifested in the way we relate. These ideas are shaped by the findings of modern science which describe reality to us as vast space filled with potential (the Virtual): A Quantum world of relationships that underpins all things. Life emerges, the scientists tell us, as a chord that explodes out of separate notes held together into something that had no reality before the relationship, and has no reality when the relationship ceases.



Story and Deep Dialogue have always connected us to something greater

Deep Dialogue and the practice of sharing Story is possibly the most misunderstood, and taken-for-granted, form of communication. The sharing of stories has always been at the root of all human transformations. Historically all indigenous cultures practiced the powers of story and deep group conversation when major decisions had to be decided upon. They understood that the deep sharing of story enabled them to tap into a wisdom and intelligence that was beyond any individual thinking  connecting them to something greater.

Prof  Ashok Gangadean, founder director of the Global Dialogue Institute writes that deep Dialogue is actually a pathway to expanding our perspectives on the world and actually expanding our own consciousness. When practiced skilfully within organisations we become self empowered to direct our own futures with a creative wisdom. We learn to tell and share the stories that motivate us and with a clear direction. Gangadean writes that Deep Dialogue is also the awakening of the Self in its most mature rational, moral and spiritual form.  Deep Dialogue is therefore both the process that brings us into a common ground world view or encounter and the realization of our highest awakening as human beings: it is at once the means and the end of the creative process of individual and corporate awakening and human flourishing.

When we step back from our own small traditions and perspectives and enter the global space of dialogue between worlds, and actually enter and experience other worlds from within we naturally go through a profound self-transformation – we are able to enter into a global perspective and hold very diverse worlds together in one expanded consciousness.  And when we enter this integral and globalized space of thought and experience we begin to see startling patterns across worldviews that have been emerging and recurring over millennia.

Dialogue and Spirituality

Dialogue and Spirituality in the work place

“A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play: his labour and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly know which is which. He simply pursues his own vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both” 

Francois Auguste Rene Chateaubriand

Most of us are aware that the institutions that direct and express our lives – politics, health, law, education, and religion- are no longer adequate to the challenges we face and feel in modern society. They are no longer able to sufficiently help or nourish our lives and are often in need of radical redesign to fulfil their stated purpose in this unsettling period of changing consciousness.

Transformative leaders understand that they cannot address their organisation’ exterior issues without addressing its inner problems. Over many generations Scientists, mystics and philosophers described the wholeness of the universe where nothing exists in isolation or that no thing exists or acts independently of the whole. However today an illusion of separateness between mind and spirit and action is the primary operating image or self-understanding for many people and organisations. Nobel Laureate neuroscientist Roger Sperry states that the overemphasis on technology and the kind of scientific thinking that excludes the human soul has contributed to a neglect of our ultimate values, beliefs, motivations and meanings. We cannot civilise the outer world without civilising the inner world. Many organisations such as outdoor gear company Patagonia in the USA have successfully embraced the spiritual in the workplace and have been reaping the results for a couple of decades. They are a highly successful, resilient and creative company with strong environmental ethics.  It is no surprise that Patagonia has hundreds of applications for any job that becomes available.

There is increasing recognition amongst organisational leaders, highlighted by the numerous courses now offered in Conscious and Mindful leadership, that we are  becoming very aware of the importance of the spiritual dimension at work. What is emerging is the quest to discover, remember, or create significant purpose, and meaning in our work. Those reeling from stress and burn out from an over engagement are now searching inward for courage, strength, wisdom, motivation and energy.

Renowned systems thinker and organisational expert Margaret Wheatley suggested that in many cases it is not the structure of the organisations that need to change but the conversations we have within them. Dialogue is not only a powerful technology for redesign or organisational change but also offers a transformed way of relating and experiencing the world. Well facilitated Dialogue naturally builds an empathetic environment for participants to fully experience the inner dimension of Spirit and help connect the group with their inner spiritual nature that directs, empowers and provides new energy and meaning activity. Spirituality has to do with making sense of our world, and knowing how creatively live within it. Group dialogue creates the space and the foundations for spirituality through its attitude to openness, skills of listening ability to connect with life through others and mostly importantly enabling the unknown to find form.

An aware participatory leader who is skilled in the Art of Dialogue creates an environment for the forming or reforming of the deeper part of the Self. The concept of formation is one of change or flux that is constant with any organism. This change is not a random meaningless event but is connected to the ongoing formation of the world around it. Dialogue provides a container for creative formative thinking that enables people to transcend the limits of their bodily senses and cognitive processes of rational thought and memory.


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